Film Review: “Dora and the Lost City of Gold”

Dora the Explorer was 7 when the audience met her on TV, a multi-song singer who traveled the map in search of answers and solving puzzles, accompanied by a big-mouthed backpack and an equally chatty monkey, Potts. Nearly 20 years have passed since the adventure show first aired (which is enough to cultivate a massive global awareness), but only 10 years in the world of Dora, which means her live debut, “Dora and Lost City of Gold” by James Poppin Audiences of all ages who have the opportunity to see the character – whose never-ending thirst for education is boundless – face the ultimate test: adapting to an American high school.

If that sounds like an excuse for a speed, TV-to-movie parody – something in the context of “21 Jump Street” or “The Dukes of Hazzard,” perhaps – think again. Yes, the movie is postmodern enough to admit that there is something odd about Dora’s tendency to break the fourth wall (as when you turn around and ask the audience, “Can you say ‘Deliciuso’?) And spontaneous songwriting on any occasion. But the script’s most endearing qualities are Nicholas Stoller and Matthew Robinson – not to mention they didn’t try to whiten their Latin heroine – is the way for Dora to remain tirelessly optimistic no matter the situation, whether it’s navigating treacherous Inca temples or facing a hall of cynical teen peers.

Film Review: “Dora and the Lost City of Gold”

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